CBT APPROACHES TO SOCIAL ANXIETY, PART 1: DIGGING DEEPER INTO THE MODELS

The National Social Anxiety Center (NSAC) conducted this one-hour clinical education webinar on February 5, 2021 in which we presented an overview of four major cognitive-behavioral therapy approaches to helping persons overcome their social anxiety. This is part 1 of a two-part webinar. The second part, in November, 2021, discusses how to integrate these four approaches.

(In addition, NSAC conducted an in-depth, 3-hour workshop on Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Integrative Strategy, complete with many cileit worksheets and instructional handouts.)

These are the four CBT approaches to treating social anxiety, as presented by representatives of NSAC regional clinics.

Richard Heimberg, PhD: presented by Taylor Wilmer, PhD (NSAC Montgomery County, Maryland / Northern Virginia). See Heimberg’s therapist manual: Managing Social Anxiety, Therapist Guide: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach (3rd edition), by Debra Hope, Richard Heimberg and Cynthia Turk. Also see his client workbook: Managing Social Anxiety, Workbook: A Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Approach (3rd edition), by the same authors.

Stefan Hofmann, PhD: presented by Lauren Neaman, PsyD, A-CBT (NSAC Chicago, and NSAC Co-Chair). See Hofmann’s therapist manual: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: Evidence-Based and Disorder Specific Treatment Techniques (2nd edition), by Stefan Hofmann and Michael Otto.

Christine Padesky, PhD: presented by Jim Shenk, PhD, A-CBT (NSAC San Diego). See Padesky’s audio presentation and video presentation on treating social anxiety.

David M Clark, DPhil: presented by Randy Weiss, LCSW, A-CBT (NSAC Phoenix) and Daniel Chazin, PhD (NSAC Philadelphia). See Clark’s training videos and other therapy materials on treating social anxiety. (You must register to view these resources.)

Moderator: Celeste Conlon, PhD, A-CBT (NSAC Houston / Sugar Land).

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NOTICE:
Our workshops and webinars are offered as an educational resource for
mental health professionals who are already familiar with cognitive and behavioral therapies.
These resources alone do not suffice as adequate training
to conduct cognitive and behavioral therapies
for those with social anxiety and related problems.